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DAISY Award Winner Jennifer Hurst Recognized for Delivering Exceptional Care

October 17, 2012

Blacksburg, VA, October, 2012 – When it comes to caring for patients at the Birthing Center at LewisGale Hospital Montgomery, Jennifer Hurst, R.N.C., is known for her exceptional bedside manner. One physician was so impressed with the way she cared for a critically ill postpartum patient, she felt compelled to nominate her for the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses.

The physician described Jennifer as attentive, intuitive, and very concerned about the welfare of the patient. “I felt very comfortable leaving the patient on the OB unit and knew she would be okay,” wrote the physician on the nomination form.

Jennifer started her nursing career on the Progressive Unit of the hospital after graduating from Wytheville Community College in 2003.  After six years in critical care, she transferred to her current position in labor and delivery. Jennifer’s passion for patients is the reason the hospital chose her as its second quarter DAISY award winner.

“I was shocked,” said Jennifer when she found out she had won the award. “I don’t give good care to my patients so I can be rewarded. I do it because I care about my patients and their families. My passion is taking care of really sick patients and being involved in the healing process.”

Jennifer often uses her experience and clinical expertise to mentor other nurses.

“Jennifer brings a wealth of knowledge to the Birthing Center and I love to draw this from her,” said Sandra Redcay, R.N.C. “Her background makes it easy for her to pick up on complications in our patients. She is a breath of fresh air and gives excellent nursing care.”

The Daisy Award for Extraordinary Nurses was established by the Daisy Foundation, a not-for-profit organization based in Glen Ellen, California.  The foundation was started by family members in memory of J. Patrick Barnes. Patrick died at the age of 33 from complications of Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura, a little known but not uncommon auto-immune disease. The care Patrick and his family received from nurses inspired this unique means of thanking nurses for making a profound difference in the lives of their patients and patients’ families. 

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